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Lately everyone's been talking about about coconut water, the newest and trendiest way to stay hydrated. It is said to help with a multitude of things, from weight loss to improving the hair, skin and nails; but have you wondered how many of the magical elixir claims are actually true?

Nutrition Diva recently blogged about taking a closer look at coconut water and their findings just might bring it back down to earth. The drinks main benefits stem from its large quanities of potassium. While coconut water supposedly reduces stress, has anti-aging properties, and helps with weight loss and kidney cleansing, those are actually claims associated with any diet of fruits and vegetables rich in potassium; and coconut water doesn't contain fiber, which fruits and vegetables do. If you already eat a good amount of fruits and vegetables, coconut water certainly won't be harmful, but it might not offer anything you're not already getting. Nutrition Diva also reminds us not forget that often ignored word- "calories". It's fifty calories a cup- not a lot, but we all know they have a sneaky way of adding up. If you aren't active, for instance, it might be a source of unnecessary calories.

Now, just because coconut water is not a miracle in a bottle doesn't mean that coconut water isn't good for you. Nutrition Diva goes on to say that despite the fact that the "benefits" claims are a little overblown, coconut water has some very good attributes. If you don't already get a good amount of potassium in your diet, its high levels can be very beneficial. It's great for hydration, too, and it contains electrolytes that can replenish the body after a workout, a sort of natural Gatorade. As mentioned, it isn't zero-calorie, like water; but if you are active to begin with, it can be a great refreshing drink after a run.

So what do you think? Are you a loyal drinker of coconut water, or are you still not convinced it's good for you at all? Comment below and share your opinions!


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